North to experience cold conditions; rains in south, east, central India

IMD forecast for the next three days shows cyclonic circulations over the Bay of Bengal and the Arabian Sea, which may bring more rains at least for a week

Delhi
Delhi's temperature is dropping rapidly and could dip to six degrees Celsius by Saturday (January 15), says the IMD. Pic: PTI

Several states in north India will experience cold wave conditions for the next two days, said the India Meteorological Department (IMD) on Tuesday (January 11).

At the same time, parts of central, east and south India are likely to receive moderate to heavy rains for the next three days mainly due to cyclonic circulations over the Bay of Bengal and the Arabian Sea.

Haryana, Punjab, Chandigarh, parts of west Uttar Pradesh, north Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh and Gujarat will see minimum temperature drop by 2 to 3 degrees Celsius and hover around 6 to 8 degrees.

Heavy rainfall is likely in Jharkhand, Odisha, Bihar, Assam, Meghalaya and Chhattisgarh. Vidarbha in Maharashtra and east Madhya Pradesh may witness isolated and scattered rainfall, the IMD stated.

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In south, Telangana, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Kerala and Andhra Pradesh will also receive isolated to scattered rainfall over the next three days.

The weather department had issued an orange alert for Odisha for Tuesday and Wednesday. The department issued a yellow alert for Bihar, West Bengal and Jharkhand till January 13. An orange alert means “extremely bad weather” while yellow means “severely bad weather”.

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The two active cyclonic conditions — one over southwest Bay of Bengal and the other over north Konkan —  in addition to moist winds from both the seas will bring rains in central, eastern and southern parts of the country for the next three days, the weather bulletin issued by the IMD stated.

Strong western disturbances will pass through the northern parts of the country between January 16 and January 18 bringing in more rains.

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