Final NRC list: No Aadhaar for those who can’t prove citizenship

When the draft NRC was published, there was a huge controversy over the exclusion of 40.7 lakh people from it. The draft included names of 2.9 crore people out of the 3.29 crore applicants. Representative purpose only. Photo: PTI File.

Aadhaar cards will be issued to all those who were excluded in the draft National Register of Citizens NRC but could get an entry in the final list to be published on Saturday (August 31), officials said.

This will happen as NRC authorities have taken biometric data from more than 36 lakh people who have claimed Indian citizenship after their exclusion from the draft NRC published on July 30, 2018.

However, those who may be excluded from the final National Register of Citizens (NRC) and can not prove their Indian citizenship after pursuing legal process will not be eligible for obtaining Aadhaar cards anywhere in the country as their biometrics will be flagged.

“The biometric data taken during the process of claims of the NRC will ensure that those who are in the final NRC will get Aadhaar and those who could not prove their Indian citizenship will not get it anywhere in the country,” a senior home ministry official said.

When the draft NRC was published, there was a huge controversy over the exclusion of 40.7 lakh people from it. The draft included names of 2.9 crore people out of the 3.29 crore applicants.

Also read: As NRC deadline nears, fear and frustration engulf Assam

In addition to those excluded, the names of over a lakh people were also left out in a list published last month. All those whose names were excluded from the draft NRC were given opportunity to apply before the authorities with designated documents to claim their Indian citizenship.

During this process, the biometric data were taken from the applicants. Assam has a very low penetration of Aadhaar scheme and less than 15 per cent state people have obtained Aadhaar cards so far, another official said.

The final NRC will be published on Saturday. Those who may not be part of the final NRC can approach any of the 300 foreigners tribunals to challenge the exclusion.

If an individual’s claim is rejected by a tribunal, he or she can approach the high court and subsequently the Supreme Court.

The Supreme Court-monitored NRC exercise, aimed at identifying illegal immigrants, mostly from Bangladesh, was carried out only in Assam, which has been facing influx of people from the neighbouring country since the early 20th century.

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