BCCI backs Dhoni after ICC wants removal of army insignia from his gloves

MS Dhoni - The Federal
MS Dhoni's wicket-keeping gloves featuring the 'Balidan' badge. Photo: PTI

MS Dhoni sporting a pair of wicket-keeping gloves bearing a logo similar to the badge of honour given to the Para Commandos has triggered a new controversy, with the ICC seeking the removal of the gloves and the BCCI standing firm behind the former skipper.

In the opening match for India against South Africa in the ongoing World Cup, Dhoni was seen wearing the gloves that featured a ‘balidan’ badge. Committee of Administrators (CoA) chief Vinod Rai said that they have already written to the ICC to seek permission for Dhoni to wear the badge on his gloves. India had defeated Proteas in the match by 6 wickets.

The controversy soon triggered a social media backlash and the hashtags, #DhoniKeepTheGlove and #BalidanBadge, started trending on the micro-blogging website Twitter.

IPL chief Rajiv Shukla said that BCCI is in full support of MS Dhoni. “It is his wish and nothing political or harmful is intended in doing this,” he said.

Sources in the ICC said that if Dhoni and the BCCI manage to convince the top cricket governing body that the badge has no political, religious or racial message, it may allow the former skipper to sport the badge.

What is the gloves controversy?

The badge, seen on Dhoni’s green-colour wicket-keeping gloves during India’s opening match against South Africa, had a regimental dagger, which is a distinct insignia of the special forces. However, the International Cricket Council (ICC) has asked the Board of Cricket Control in India (BCCI) to get the symbol removed from his gloves.

Dhoni had received it when he underwent a training under the Para Brigade in 2015. He was also conferred an honorary rank of Lieutenant Colonel in the Parachute Regiment in 2011.

According to the ICC regulations, the equipment and clothing does not allow any content or symbol related to political or religious activities during international matches.